anders-holmdick:

god I am so tired of people throwing roses at my feet as I walk by

(Actually not pls continue)

(via dutchster)


Michael Swaney

Henry Darger
The depth of isolation in the ghetto is also evident in black speech patterns, which have evolved steadily away from Standard American English. Because of their intense social isolation, many ghetto residents have come to speak a language that is increasingly remote from that spoken by American whites. Black street speech, or more formally, Black English Vernacular, has its roots in the West Indian creole and Scots-Irish dialects of the eighteenth century. As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.
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Douglas Massey and Nancy A. Denton, Chapter 6: “The Perpetuation of the Underclass,” p. 162 (American apartheid: segregation and the making of the underclass)

As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.

(via deux-zero-deux)

(via newwavefeminism)

parkuspanda:

Pikmin Jump!
flowersgardenlove:

colocasia esculenta Beautiful gorgeous pretty flowers
humans-of-pdx:

"This is my first cabbage! You know, a lot of times they’re kind of soft, but this one is solid! It’s going to be good eatin’!" "What are you going to make with it?""Well, this one I’m giving to my parents. You have to give the first one away or you just spoil the whole spirit of gardening."